Prioritizing tourism in ‘unexplored Assam’ which is left to be awesome on its own

With its majestic valleys and hills, river tracts and jungles, Assam can easily enchant almost anybody who chooses to visit this ancient land. Despite such endowments, the tourism potential of the region has still not yet been adequately channelized.

Over the last few years, however, the government has taken a number of appreciable initiatives to attract tourists to ‘Awesome Assam’. Such efforts, however, have not yet been able to satisfactorily include the sights of Barak Valley and hill districts. Both regions have considerable historical and religious sights, picturesque hill ranges, caves networks, expansive lakes and breathtaking waterfalls.

Barak Valley, for instance, has the Shon Beel, which is the second largest seasonal wetland of Asia.  It attracts varieties of fishes, migratory birds and the green forests which makes it a mesmerizing sight. The place also has an abundance of religious spots like Panch Phir Mukkam and Kancha Kanti Kali Temple. The latter was built some 200 years ago following a dream of the then Kachari king.

The hill districts are abound with jungles with exotic wildlife. Along with this, Haflong with its narrow alleys and terraced cityscape is perhaps one of the most beautiful hill stations in Northeast India. Improving the tourist infrastructure of the town could help it become a major summer destination for visitors who otherwise flock to Shillong.

Maibong is another beautiful town having significant potential. Then there is Jatinga, a place where birds mysteriously commit suicide – an extremely interesting place to visit for any bird lover.

Along with the above, places like Mahur, Ditokchera, Harangajao, which are hardly even known to most people living in Assam, offers spectacularly scenic views, which would enthral almost any nature lover.

Finally, passing through most of these places is perhaps one of Assam most beautiful secret – the railway route of the hill districts. Built decades ago, and with a generous share of tunnels, the railway journey is itself a tourist attraction.

By actively developing the tourism potential of these regions, the government can further broaden up the map of “Awesome Assam”.

About Arman Tapadar

-

Arman Tapadar is a student at Gauhati University in Guwahati. He is pursuing MSc in Economics

Previous

Assam’s ‘Leteku’ goes global with first batch of fruit exported to Dubai

Kohima ranks among top 10 ‘smart cities’ in India

Next